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September 18th, 2005

Sunday Bloody Sunday @ 10:46 am

lumencuro:
I'm currently feelin: nostalgic nostalgic
I'm currently hearin: U2 - Sunday Bloody Sunday

For those of you that really liked my other survey: Here is another one!
For those of you that never saw or got my other survey: Another Chance.

Here is basically a Song of the Day with a survey.

The song: Sunday Bloody Sunday
The albums: War, Under A Blood Red Sky, and Best of 1980-1990.

Importance and Overall Appeal: High
Reason: This was the first U2 song that made me fully realize that these boys ROCK!

First Time Heard: on the Live8 video (from over 20 years ago when a young Bono had a mullet and the band was still under the radar screen to most of the world). Now I have the videos, the songs, the albums, a love for the band and so on and so forth...

First Time It Meant Something: History Class - It was played to get us to think about the importance music plays on History. Funny thing is the very next semester in History I got a young student teacher that implemented the idea into his curriculum and I had no choice but to replay this awesome song. I was first to volunteer for the assignment and I was proud to play this for all my classmates to hear. Additionally, for the first time in a while I really did not care if they liked me or the song. I was determined to play this awesome song! I got an 11/10 and to this day no-one has topped my command performance on that nice Spring Day...

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Enough of me, Here are the 3 Questions that I have for you:

1) What do you think of this song and the importance it plays to U2 being who they are today?

2a) Where did you first hear this song (and if you say Live8 where else)?

2b) Has anyone heard this song live and in person?

3) Where do you rank this song against all other U2 songs?

Optional Bonus:

?) How do you make this song personal to you or what connections do you have with this song, if any?

Any other information about this song that you wish to share is welcome:


Thank you in advance for sharing.
 
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Comments

 
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From:chris15
Date:September 18th, 2005 06:11 pm (UTC)
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1) What do you think of this song and the importance it plays to U2 being who they are today?

First, I think that this song was U2's entrance into the political world, where they expressed their anti-war belief in a lyrical and musical fashion. I think that when most people hear this song, it provides them with a new acceptance of the band, because it ties together all of the aspects of which we love this band for. It showcases Larry's drums, Bono's voice, Edge's guitar and Adam's bassline. (In no particular order.) Which is exactly why I love this song.

2a) Where did you first hear this song (and if you say Live8 where else)?

I first heard this song when I was in the car with my mom, at a fairly young age. (I can't really remember exactly, but as I'm typing this, I'm 15 years of age.)

2b) Has anyone heard this song live and in person?

I haven't seen it in person, but I've watched the recordings/videos of them performing it live, and I think the first video I watched was the Live Aid performance in 1985 at Wembley Stadium in London-- if I'm wrong about the setting, please correct me. Another video of a live performance that got under my skin was the performance from Slane Castle, where at the end of the song, Bono read off names of those who were killed in the Omagh bombing which took place in 1998. (If I'm correct.)

3) Where do you rank this song against all other U2 songs?

Among all other songs, I rate this particular one in at least the top 10. I have many, many favorites for numerous different reasons, but overall this is, hands down, one of U2's best songs.

Optional Bonus:

?) How do you make this song personal to you or what connections do you have with this song, if any?

In addition to what's been listed above, my family has been involved with many different tragedies as well as hardships, a relative of mine had been critically injured by the World Trade Center bombing in 1993. My brother enlisted in the military and was sent overseas at the age of 18 to fight in the Middle East. (I was only 6 years old.) And myself as well as my immediate family had been in New York City on the day of September 11th, and witnessed the attacks firsthand. I relate Sunday Bloody Sunday to these events as well as other, more personal ones.

I believe I answered all of your questions. :)
From:lumencuro
Date:September 18th, 2005 07:03 pm (UTC)
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Thank you for sharing all of that; it was very well put...
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From:ladyclayton
Date:September 18th, 2005 06:29 pm (UTC)
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1) What do you think of this song and the importance it plays to U2 being who they are today?
I think that between Live Aid (Live8 was a 2005 thing), Red Rocks, and the massive rotation it got on the radio, this song helped propel U2 into a wider public consciousness, particularly in the US. The Live Aid performance is particularly responsible for bringing the boys to everyone's attention, but I wouldn't say that SBS was the song that pushed U2 over the top that day...that honour goes to "Bad." After Live Aid, "Bad" was what everyone was talking about (and what Madonna was wearing, but we were kids, so you know...).


2a) Where did you first hear this song (and if you say Live8 where else)?
I heard it on the radio. I was just getting into U2 at the time, and I liked this song a lot, particularly the bridge. I would listen to it and jump around a lot...the political message was over my head (I was nine).


2b) Has anyone heard this song live and in person?
At any number of the U2 shows I've been to.


3) Where do you rank this song against all other U2 songs?
Oh man. I hate ranking U2 songs! Definitely in the Top 10...not so sure about the Top 5.


Optional Bonus:

?) How do you make this song personal to you or what connections do you have with this song, if any?

This song seems very appropo to our time in a number of contexts. "How long must we sing this song" seems to be the constant question of the last 22 years.
From:lumencuro
Date:September 18th, 2005 07:07 pm (UTC)
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I can totally relate. I hate ranking U2 songs, too! What are the emotions of the band and the audience like when the drums begin to play and Bono begins to sing this song?

"How long must we sing this song"
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From:volare
Date:September 18th, 2005 07:09 pm (UTC)

where's the glory in that......?

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1) What do you think of this song and the importance it plays to U2 being who they are today?

To me it was their first major stepping stone into America's collective awareness as anything other than a punkish fourpiece from Ireland.

2a) Where did you first hear this song?

Wafting from open doors and garden gates in South Boston and Dorchester when War was first released, but I didn't fully grasp the song til I was a bit older, around 1986.

2b) Has anyone heard this song live and in person?
Yes.

3) Where do you rank this song against all other U2 songs?
eh, I can't play that game. It's like trying to rank the bones in my body in order of importance.

?) How do you make this song personal to you or what connections do you have with this song, if any?

It had been around peripherally thanks to growing up in inner Boston most of my life, but what slammed it home was seeing the performance of it on R&H, that first heady night of the movie's release. Up until then... I'd been one of the 'American Irish' types he was railing about.

A friend and I had even made a pact some years before... if we hadn't found any reason to stay here by the time we turned 18, we were going to join the IRA... how bloody ignorant and ridiculous of us, good Gods.

With the song I'd been hearing all my life as a triumphalistic paen to Irish Republicanism suddenly transformed into a dirge; as I sat in that theater in the dark I think I felt my heart turn black. Black with shame and black with horror, that I could have missed the point of the song so badly, that I'd been a part, however small, of something that this band, these men I damn near idolized, found so repugnant and hurtful. That he might as well have been yelling at me.

And I found out that I didn't really know jack shit about the Troubles. I thought I did, in the typical arrogance of any teenaged American political-punk..

I went on to minor in Irish history in college. Because of that one performance of that one song... I had to learn the reality. Like a slap in the face, this song woke me up and drove me to educate myself about my own heritage and not just toe the expected line.

This song made me find the truth. About me, and about Ireland.
From:lumencuro
Date:September 18th, 2005 07:17 pm (UTC)

Re: where's the glory in that......?

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Good stuff! Thank you for sharing... What is like hearing this song live? I can't rank U2 songs either, so don't feel bad.
From:sabneraznik
Date:September 19th, 2005 03:04 am (UTC)

Re: where's the glory in that......?

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eh, I can't play that game. It's like trying to rank the bones in my body in order of importance.

Heh, so true!
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From:chelsea_doll
Date:September 18th, 2005 08:43 pm (UTC)
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1) What do you think of this song and the importance it plays to U2 being who they are today?

I think it's a great song and brings out a range of emotions in people when it's played. I think it really showcased U2's political views and you always here people quoting the "This song is not a rebel song..." part. Or at least I do.

2a) Where did you first hear this song (and if you say Live8 where else)?

Back in 1989 when my cousin bought me the War album.

2b) Has anyone heard this song live and in person?

Yup, every time I've seen them they have played it.

3) Where do you rank this song against all other U2 songs?

I love it because it's on my favorite U2 album and I think it's one of the better staples in a U2 live show.
From:lumencuro
Date:September 19th, 2005 12:23 am (UTC)
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Tell me more about hearing this song live, as I have yet to hear it live when I have gone to see U2 in the past...
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From:luindilwen
Date:September 18th, 2005 10:56 pm (UTC)
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1) What do you think of this song and the importance it plays to U2 being who they are today?
I think it definitely got them noticed on a political scale. Without songs like Sunday Bloody Sunday, I doubt U2 would have the following and credibility that they have now.

2a) Where did you first hear this song (and if you say Live8 where else)?
I'll always remember watching the recorded Live Aid concert and seeing them sing this. Other than that, no moment really sticks out as the first time I heard it. I was raised on U2, and this song is just set in my memory.

2b) Has anyone heard this song live and in person?
I just saw them for the first time this year, in Vancouver, and hearing them perform it was so fantastic. Bono stopped mid-song to break into some ad-libbed religious piece that was a little confusing (where he pulled on the "Coexist" bandana) but in all, it was great.

3) Where do you rank this song against all other U2 songs?
It's probably not my favourite song, but I really love it. From that era, though, I think I prefer New Year's Day.
From:lumencuro
Date:September 19th, 2005 12:28 am (UTC)
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Who was it that influenced you to listen U2 in the first place?
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From:luindilwen
Date:September 19th, 2005 12:36 am (UTC)
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My mom, definitely. I'm a second generation U2 fan, and we've had their music in our house for practically my whole life. I had no choice, I've always had to listen to them. ;)
From:lumencuro
Date:September 19th, 2005 02:41 am (UTC)
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Kudos to your Mom! U2 is great and that is exactly why they deserve/are in the Rock And Roll Hall of Fame... Bono will also get a Nobel Peace prize for his Africa work before it is all said and done. :)
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From:wydok
Date:September 18th, 2005 11:42 pm (UTC)
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1) What do you think of this song and the importance it plays to U2 being who they are today?

This song introduced the world to the band's political and religious agenda when it came to the conflict in Northern Ireland. They are neither pro-British nor pro-IRA. They are pro-peace. This song cemented them into the "damn hippies" category. Although, there is an anger in the song. A burning want for peace that translates into frustration and anger. You can especially see this in the Rattle and Hum concert film.

2a) Where did you first hear this song (and if you say Live8 where else)?

I probably heard it first on the radio.

2b) Has anyone heard this song live and in person?

I saw U2 perform this song at the Wachovia Center in Philadelpha on May 22, 2005. It wasn't their best live performance (compared to the ones I've seen on DVD), but it was still moving to be there live.

3) Where do you rank this song against all other U2 songs?

Pretty high. Not in the top 10 for me, but definetly the top 20.

Optional Bonus:

?) How do you make this song personal to you or what connections do you have with this song, if any?

I'm partially Irish. I was born and raised Catholic, but turned Protestant when I went to college. I've never been to Ireland, and I don't know what side of the pail my family was from. But I am Irish, and that's good enough to make it personal.

Also, I consider myself a pretty peaceful person. War sucks, no matter what it is for. And Jesus never asked for anyone to fight a war in his name. In fact, he did the opposite (he would not lead the Isrealites in a revolt against the Romans), which is why Judas betrayed him.
From:lumencuro
Date:September 19th, 2005 12:31 am (UTC)
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Very interesting points! I like the way you put the way that it truly is. What is special about the live version of this song that makes people so into it? I have seen U2 before but not gotten to hear this song live, yet.
From:sabneraznik
Date:September 19th, 2005 02:59 am (UTC)
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1. All important. It announced them as both Irish and humanitarian, and was a showcase of each of their talents, and what they would continue to bring to rock and roll in the future.

2a. At home watching MTV. I was only 4 or 5 so I can't remember details.

2b. no.

3. Definitely one of their best, but hard to place it with a specific number.

?. I have an incredible empathy for anyone who has to live through difficult experiances such as the troubles, and this song plays to that in me.
From:lumencuro
Date:September 19th, 2005 06:28 am (UTC)
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True! Yes, I have never liked ranking a U2 song against another U2 song... This song did help put them on the map and for that I am very grateful. I respect the group for everything that they have done for the last 25 years and seem to have little intention of stopping the good work they have done over the years now...

Keep on rocking boys, we love your music! I alone know that you have felt and know what I feel and you sing about it so well... Never forget that and you will always be considered the best that there is at everything that you do musically or socially.

How can anyone argue with what they (U2) has done as a band and what Bono has done as a person with a powerful influence? The awards for both continue to pile up and all are very deserved!
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From:canadanne
Date:December 4th, 2005 12:04 am (UTC)
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This is one of several longish threads that I bookmarked *ages* ago and then never had the time to read through!

Better late than never...

1) What do you think of this song and the importance it plays to U2 being who they are today?
War came out in the year I was born, so I wouldn't really know what kind of impact it made at the time. But as other people have said, it's one of the tracks where they are most vocal about their beliefs, so I would say it's an essential U2 song. And what a kickarse way to open the album (the first really grown-up sounding album of theirs, with a real power and maturity to it). No wonder they were really starting to grab the world's attention by this point.

2a) Where did you first hear this song (and if you say Live8 where else)?
On the Best Of 1980-1990 collection, which was my first U2 CD. I bought it in 1999.

2b) Has anyone heard this song live and in person?
Yes, they played it at all the shows I've been to (one on the Elevation Tour and two on the Vertigo Tour). The Elevation performance was a little disappointing, it felt limp compared to other live versions I'd heard (notably in the Rattle & Hum movie), but the Vertigo perfomances were brilliant as Bono did the "NO MORE!" call-and-response this time. Plus it was very cool how everyone started singing the "Ohhh oh ohhh, oh-oh ohhh oh ohhh" tune as soon as they recognised the intro!  I couldn't believe nobody around me was really moving though, I don't know how you can hear that drumbeat without having the overwhelming urge to start marching on the spot.

3) Where do you rank this song against all other U2 songs?
I wouldn't say it's a personal *favourite* of mine, but there's no denying it's a bloody amazing song. It's lyrically powerful, it's fun to belt out at the top of your lungs, and it just *sounds* great!  I adore the drums and guitar riffs. Now that's what I call a song.

How do you make this song personal to you or what connections do you have with this song, if any?
I can't really think of anything specific, but I do totally agree with the anti-war sentiment - "I can't close my eyes and make it go away... how long, how long must we sing this song?". Bono's rant during the middle of the song in Rattle & Hum is dead right, I love how he spits out "And the glooorrry of the revolution!" in that enraged sarcastic tone. There's also the fact I just love singing this song, I think my voice is very well suited to the big angry War tracks!

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