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September 22nd, 2004

(no subject) @ 07:09 pm

3sidedcircle:
I'm currently feelin: embarrassed embarrassed
I'm currently hearin: Bloody Sunday

i know...i know... i should already know this by now. but i dont. What is "Sunday Bloody Sunday" about? I know it's about Bloody Sunday...but which one? There are 3 in world history and I know one took place in Ireland. Is it about that one?

Can anyone explain?

Sorry for my ignorance.
 
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From:achtungbaby
Date:September 22nd, 2004 07:43 pm (UTC)
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yep, its about the one that took place in Ireland. i wish i could tell you more details, but i'm really rusty on my U2 facts right now.
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From:miryoku
Date:September 22nd, 2004 08:11 pm (UTC)
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yes it's about the conflict in northern ireland, and bloody sunday was where police fired into a group of peaceful protesters killing thirteen of them.

http://larkspirit.com/bloodysunday/
From:ex_darshan119
Date:September 22nd, 2004 08:59 pm (UTC)

Watch and Learn. . .

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Bloody Sunday

It is a docu-drama that re-enacts the events of that infamous Sunday. The thick accents demand that you pay attention, but this will help get you back in the loop.

Good luck!
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From:3sidedcircle
Date:September 22nd, 2004 09:05 pm (UTC)
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thanks guys SO much! i was able to look at some of the articles and hopefully..sometime in the near future... i'll be able to rent that documentary and LEARN more about it.

this has helped a lot.
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From:nemica
Date:September 22nd, 2004 11:56 pm (UTC)
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Bloody Sunday is a term used to describe two controversial events in Irish history, the killings of marchers in Derry in 1972 and the massacre of players and people attending a gaelic football match in Croke Park in Dublin in 1920.

The latter Bloody Sunday had its origins in the Irish War of Independence (1919-21), which followed the formation of an unilaterally declared Irish Republic and its self-declared parliament, Dáil Éireann. The army of the self-declared 'republic', the Irish Republican Army waged a guerrilla war against the Royal Irish Constabulary, the police force of Ireland under British rule. In response, the British Government formed its own paramilitary forces, the Black and Tans known by its nickname which was a result of its uniform, and the Auxiliary Cadets generally known as the Auxiliaries. The behaviour of the Black and Tans immediately became controversial for their brutality and violence towards not just the IRA but Irish people in general, but it was the Auxiliaries that were responsible for the Bloody Sunday massacre.

On November 21 1920, Irish republican minister and head of the Irish Republican Brotherhood Michael Collins ordered the assassination of what was known as the 'Cairo Gang', fourteen British Intelligence officers sent to infiltrate Irish nationalist organisations. This action severely crippled British intelligence in Ireland and caused consternation among forces of the Crown. Their response was 'Bloody Sunday'.

The Dublin gaelic football team was scheduled to play the Tipperary team on November 21 1920 in Croke Park. One of the British auxiliaries involved in 'Bloody Sunday' recalled that they tossed a coin over whether they would go on a killing spree in Croke Park or loot Sackville Street (Dublin's main street, now called O'Connell Street) instead.

Approximately 10,000 spectators went to Croke Park for the match. However within minutes of the start of the game, an airplane flew over the ground and a red flare was shot from the cockpit. Auxiliaries began raiding the ground while an officer on top of the wall fired a revolver shot. After a burst of gunfire, the crowd began to stampede away from the gunfire. Two football players, Michael Hogan and Jim Egan, were shot. A young Wexford man who attempted to whisper an Act of Contrition into the dying Hogan's ear was also shot dead. The casualties included John Scott, who was fourteen and so mutilated that it was initially thought that he had been savagely bayoneted. The youngest victims were aged 10 and 11.

The actions of the Auxiliaries, like indeed much of their actions and the actions of the Black and Tans, were unauthorised and were greeted with horror by the Dublin Castle-based British authorities. In an effort to cover up the nature of the behaviour by forces of the Crown, a press release was issued which claimed:

A number of men came to Dublin on Saturday under the guise of asking to attend a football match between Tipperary and Dublin. But their real intention was to take part in the series of murderous outrages which took place in Dublin that morning. Learning on Saturday that a number of these gunmen were present in Croke Park, the crown forces went to raid the field. It was the original intention that an officer would go to the centre of the field and speaking from a megaphone, invite the assassins to come forward. But on their approach, armed pickets gave warning. Shots were fired to warn the wanted men, who caused a stampede and escaped in the confusion.

On January 30, 1972, soldiers from the British Army's 1st Parachute Regiment opened fire on unarmed and peaceful civilian demonstrators in the Bogside, Derry, Ireland, near the Rossville flats, killing 13 and wounding a number of others. One wounded man later died from illness attributed to that shooting.
The march, which was called to protest internment, was "illegal" according to British government authorities. Internment without trial was introduced by the British government on August 9, 1971.

The British-government-appointed Widgery Tribunal found soldiers were not guilty of shooting dead the 13 civilians in cold blood.
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From:3sidedcircle
Date:September 23rd, 2004 07:44 pm (UTC)
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WOAH HEY!!! thanks SO much for the info. it's greatly appreciated!
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From:nemica
Date:September 24th, 2004 12:32 am (UTC)
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Always welcome and greetings from Russia. :)
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From:moydrumm
Date:September 23rd, 2004 07:20 am (UTC)
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You're all wrong.

It's about the bloody sunday at Inneskillin.
Bono and Adam say this in a speech on the dvd: Rattle and Hum
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From:canadanne
Date:September 23rd, 2004 08:18 am (UTC)

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Unless I'm mistaken, the Enniskillen bombing happened while U2 were on tour that year. Bono drew on this when they performed Sunday Bloody Sunday, but it wasn't the original inspiration for the song.
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From:bonoinakilt
Date:September 23rd, 2004 10:37 am (UTC)
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You aren't mistaken. The Enniskillen bombing happened in 1987.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/stories/november/8/newsid_2515000/2515113.stm

Sunday Bloody Sunday is obviously, not about the Enniskillen bombing..

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